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THUNDER “Love at First Sight” by Glen Lane

Thunder

In January of 1972, I made my annual trip to the Toronto Boat Show. For me, nothing particularly unusual. But this time I wanted to move from my Viking 28 to something a bit more ocean friendly. Nothing in the spanking new plethora of sailing yachts caught my eye. They were pretty, clean, new – but not for the ocean. Frustrated, I then wandered to the brokerage area to see what was for sale there. Immediately one boat caught my eye. A 45 ft. S&S designed yawl built by Smith & Rhuland from Lunenburg. Rod Stevens, from Sparkman and Stevens, was actually in Lunenburg many times to supervise the building of the boat. As I’m from Truro, Nova Scotia I was brought up to know and respect this builder – the same builder of the Bluenose, Bluenose II and the Bounty, to name but a few. The specs for this yawl were impressive: double planked mahogany over cedar with oak frames, teak decks, Perkins marine diesel engine, sitka spruce spars, and it had the look of an ocean yacht. I even liked the name, Thunder. My brother, who also lived in Toronto, and I were planning a trip to Nova Scotia in the summer so I set up an appointment to see Thunder and its owner, Ralph MacDonald, at the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron. For me it was love at first sight. I needed that boat. And rather quickly a deal was struck!  Ralph would have Thunder winterized, and in the spring he would paint it, launch it, and ready it for the trip to Toronto.

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 JULIA BAY TO CHIKANISHING IN A 16FT DINGHY – Sean Grant

Cruising North Channel in a CL 16

Any day-sailor will probably know, the title of this account is an homage to the late Frank Dye—an inspirational and some would say mad sailor who took his 16ft Wayfarer “Wanderer” from Northern Scotland to Iceland (not to mention many other destinations). About a year ago, I read his book that documented this journey and began to think about similar (yet, less risky) adventures that I could have. My first idea was to sail around Manitoulin Island. With its rugged and often uninhabited shoreline, it seemed like a great place for cruising and camping. As I looked further, I realized that the south shore was long and exposed to large swells that could build quickly, and to strong and unpredictable westerly winds and storms.

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THE HOMESTRETCH OF QUALIFYING FOR THE 2013 MINI TRANSAT RACE FROM FRANCE TO GUADELOUPE – by Diane Reid– WInter 2013

“I just love sailing. It’s as simple as that. There’s nothing like the challenge of solo racing; mental, physical, emotional and ADRENALINE…all the senses crashing together at once!” – Diane Reid
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THE FLYING BLOODSUCKERS – by Alan & Margaret Gibson- S
ummer 2012

You idly notice some new arrivals on board. First one or two, then a few more innocuous little flies land, and settle. You check them out; they resemble miniature house flies. Suddenly you find yourself under relentless biting attack from hordes of them. They seem to rise out of the water, and cover the deck of the boat. These are clearly not deerflies, mosquitoes or black flies. What are they? Where do they come from?
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ANCHORING: THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY – by Lori Moffit- Fall 2010

In the last two years, I have seen many cruisers that may not have been experienced sailors, however, they all either already knew or very quickly learned the importance of safe anchoring techniques. This article will describe how we have set up our boat, the gear we have aboard, and techniques that work, along with some interesting anchoring experiences.
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